Byron Tramway Parade

Saturday, July 13, 10 a.m. An all-ages-friendly community parade will take place on the Byron Pathway. Meet at theByron Tramway Park (just east of Island Park Drive) at 10:00. We’ll walk/stroll/roll along Byron Pathway, cross at Hilson Avenue and end at Iona Park. Costumes, music and noise makers are encouraged. Coffee and lemonade will be served at Iona Park. We will also be collecting items for the food bank.

Theatre in the park: Bear & Co in the summer

UPDATE: Bear and Co. is back for their second outdoor theatre summer season. Catch Comedy of Errors at Hintonburg Park on July 5 and 19, at Iona Park on July 6 and at Reid Park on July 30. All shows start at 7 p.m. and picnics are welcome. A hat will be passed at the end of the show.

July 12, 2012

On July 5th and 6th Bear and Co. started close to home, playing to large crowds at dusk performances in Clare Gardens Park and Hintonburg Park.

Music Director Rachel Eugster—who not only lives in Hintonburg but volunteered on a community
advisory committee in 2010-2011 during the rehabilitation of Hintonburg Park to ensure that the historic
stone wall surrounding the park would be rebuilt to reflect its heritage character—was thrilled with the
play, the venue and the audience.

“It was director Will Sommers’ inspiration to set the play in 1950, during the McCarthy era” says Eugster
who appreciates that with familiar music and costumes, Shakespeare’s themes resonate for
contemporary audiences in a way that will echo what his original audiences experienced. “The music and
costumes provide the cultural key, and I think Anna had as much fun creating 1950-era costumes as
I had choosing and preparing the music. Judging by the delighted smiles that break out on people’s faces
when they hear a familiar song, it’s clear that we are successfully communicating this sense of fun to our
audience.”

Eugster notes that 1950 was an amazing year for music and in general. Many icons of contemporary
culture began in 1950. “Saturday morning children’s programming began on TV, Charles Schultz
introduced “Peanuts” and the first Xerox machine was produced,” says Eugster who jokes that not having
a piano is her biggest challenge in programming the music for outdoor theatre.

“Partly because we’re outdoors, and partly because we’re a touring company, we are limited to using
instruments that are easily carried,” explains the musical director. “Primarily that is the voice—which is my
specialty—and we make extensive use of that, singing songs in part or in full, in harmony or in unison.
The character of the songs also invited the use of guitars and kazoos. For example, we created a trumpet
call out of one of the songs, using kazoos, to signal the bad Duke’s entrances and exits.”

With children in the front rows, deeply engaged in watching the play unfold—especially the stage fighting
—Bear and Co. truly brought Shakespeare to life close to home.

Eugster noted that “the wall makes a gorgeous backdrop for theatre. It also acts a bit as a sound
container, which makes it easier for the actors to make themselves heard—very important in an urban
environment, especially when the show is in competition with sounds from the play structure and the
splash pad.”

Students from Our Lady of Fatima celebrate National Aboriginal Day

Our Lady of Fatima

The Grade 6 students from Our Lady of Fatima School, 2135 Knightbridge Road, attended the Summer Solstice Aboriginal Arts Festival on June 21,2013. They were over 3700 students and teachers at Vincent Massey Park. The students had an opportunity to talk with His Excellency, the Right Honourable Governor General David Johnston.

National Aboriginal Day celebrations at Westboro Kiwanis Park

Kitchissippi celebrated National Aboriginal Day at Westboro Kiwanis Park on June 20, with help from the Odawa Native Friendship Centre, Dovercourt Recreation Centre and Aboriginal Experiences.

People of all ages, including kids from Churchill and Broadview schools and Dovercourt’s morning kindergarten program, enjoyed cultural displays, drumming and dance performances and educational activities.

Parkbus: Car-free camping from Kitchissippi

 

The first day of summer was also the launch of Parkbus, a new non-profit express service from Ottawa to Algonquin Provincial Park. Algonquin-bound campers and hikers boarded the bus either downtown or at MEC, 366 Richmond Road, on June 21, returning June 23.

Parkbus co-founder Alex Berlyand says the service is an alternative to car travel for people who want to enjoy hiking, canoeing and camping in Ontario’s wilderness. The service is also designed to encourage those new to camping and Ontario’s wilderness to give it a try.

While there isn’t capacity to transport canoes or kayaks on Parkbus, there are stops at outfitters within the park. A limited number of bikes are allowed on the bus, but space for your bike should be reserved at the time you book your ticket. If you are interested in bringing a pet with you, please contact Parkbus to discuss the options available.

While Parkbus runs a Toronto-Algonquin Park schedule every weekend, this year there are three pilot weekends between Ottawa and Algonquin Park. Tickets for Parkbus – which stops at multiple locations within the park for pick-up and drop-off – are on sale for the weekends of August 9-11 and September 20-22 from MEC.

Lemonade Standemonium

WEB-lemonade-DSC_1821_-sat-2

Summer and lemonade go hand in hand. The hot weather tradition of hosting lemonade stands is fun for everyone, and a common childhood memory. Kicking it up a notch, the kids of Kitchissippi joined the rest of Ottawa on June 22 and turned their sweet business ventures into a fundraiser for childhood cancer research.

“The fundraiser is called the Great Canadian Lemonade Standemonium, and this is the event, there’s people having stands all over Ottawa today,” says Lindsay Firestone. She is sitting down on a bench in front of John’s Quick Lunch as her kids run around on the sidewalk in front of her. Behind them, the lemonade stand is selling cookies, and three varieties of fresh zesty flavours.

All the children are dressed in yellow t-shirts with the fundraiser logos on the front; energetic, despite the early start they had this morning.

“I am part of the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation so we have been working on a few events and this is one we wanted to have to have kids involved,” she says. Firestone spent months visiting classrooms across the city to pitch the event to principles, teachers and kids.

“When we go into a classroom what we find is when we ask kids if they know anybody who has been touched by cancer almost ninety-five per cent of them raise their hands,” she says. “Whether it’s a teacher or a grandparent or a friend, what we’ve been finding is a lot of kids say they want to help and they don’t know how,” she says.

The fundraiser gives the kids a chance to get involved, and feel empowered in the process of helping something that affects so many people.

When approached with the idea Tony Hatoum owner of John’s Quick lunch and his wife Antonella Hatoum, who teaches at St. George, jumped at the opportunity to set up a stand in front of their restaurant.

“We knew we wanted to have one, Lindsay knew she wanted to have one, so we buddied up and put together a team effort,” says Antonella. “Tony built this great nostalgic barn board lemonade stand. It’s getting lots of feedback from people walking by and the customers, so definitely drawing the attention,” she says.

Antonella talked about the event at St. George, and her students were very receptive. She even has some competition down the road. “some of my students are set up at the natural food pantry, so they have their own going on,” she says.

Both Antonella and Firestone are excited about the communities involvement, and predict sweet success for the fundraiser.

“We just had the Mayor here to do an official ribbon cutting, so he opened our lemonade stand,” says Firestone. “I think if you get communities together they really want to help out,” she says.

“People have been super generous with their donations. There’s lots of twenties in there, twenty dollars is pretty generous for a glass of lemonade, I think,” says Antonella.

Broadview Public School: spring activities

Broadview Public School’s spring into action month encouraged students to think about healthy, active living. Walking to school, learning about the Kids Help line, choosing healthy snacks and participating in the kilometre club were all ways that Broadview’s young population started the season on the right foot.

1 – Ava Pezoulas (Westboro), Isabel Wettlaufer-Wang (Westboro), Morgan MacLeod (McKellar Park), Saer Edwards (Westboro), and Mattias Voogd (Highland Park) celebrate iWalk Wednesday and every day by walking to school.

2 – Kids Help Phone volunteer Suzie Shillington (Highland Park) spoke to students including son Evan Runia about mental health. Broadview participated in the May 5 Walk So Kids Can Talk fundraiser.

3 – Evan Runia (Highland Park) was on hand when mom and volunteer Suzie Shillington spoke to Grades 3-6 about mental health. Broadview teams walked May 5 to raise funds for Kids Help Phone.

4 – Grade 6 students get behind healthy snacks.

5 – Luka Fulford (McKellar Park) runs with heart during the launch of Broadview’s spring “Kilometre Club.”

ArtsPark 2013 Line-Up

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-CA
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

ArtsPark’s bike parade leaves from the Hintonburg Community Centre at 10:00 am. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

Art, crafts, music, performance, food, literature, and lots of family fun.

The Hintonburg Community Association presents its tenth anniversary ArtsPark on Saturday, May 25th from 10 am to 5 pm at Parkdale Park, beside the Parkdale Market. The program for this year includes:

 

Live Music

10:00 am Street of Rock

10:45 am The Elementals

11:45 am Lost Colt

12:45 pm Lucky Ron

1:45 pm  Good 2 Go

2:45 pm Robert Farell

3:45 pm Micarza Camaro

4:45 pm The Flats

 

Spoken Word performances

 

Art Exhibit of Twenty Hintonburg Artists

 

Artisan Showcase with handmade goods

 

Local Hintonburg eateries on site

 

Children’s Activities

 

100 Mile Literary Diet with local authors and their books

 

For more information, visit www.hintonburg.ca

For more on ArtsPark’s history, check out our Kitchissippi Times article!

  ArtsPark Photo Contest:

Share your Instagram photos and win!

Igers: share your Instagram photos using #ArtsPark2013, then visit kitchissippi.com or Kitchissippi Times on facebook to view the community photogallery. One lucky entry will win a gift from an ArtsPark artisan!

Area Air Cadets participate in survival weekend

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-CA
ZH-CN
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-language:ZH-CN;}

Young cadets who meet regularly at Norte Dame High School construct shelters to sleep in on their survival weekend. Photo by Kingsong Chen.

Local Air Cadets participate in Survival Weekend

Teens demonstrate strength and friendship

 

For many teenagers, a Saturday morning might be a time to relax and wind down from school. A large group of them woke up bright and early, eager to participate in a weekend of survival training. From Saturday, April 27 to Sunday, April 28, Air Cadets from 211 Ottawa Kiwanis Squadron and 661 Lt. W. F. Sharpe Squadron hosted a joint bush weekend at Limerick Forest.

The weekend focused on teaching practical survival skills to the cadets. Lessons ranged from first-aid to night navigation. The cadets were also split up into groups to construct their very own “bivouac sites.” This included a shelter which cadets had to make out of tarps, twine, branches and sticks. Cadets also had the option of participating in a survival test. “I wanted an extra challenge,” said Cadet Daniel Poirier of Lockhurt Avenue. “So I was left in a separate part of the woods with another cadet where we had to build our own shelter and survive on limited rations.” 

Capture the Flag and Downed Pilot were two outdoor games the air cadets played. Photo by Kingsong Chen

Aside from lessons, cadets were also given time to play games and bond with one another. Activities included Capture the Flag and Downed Pilot: a game where cadets have to search for an “injured pilot” and carry them back to the campsite. “I made a lot of new friends,” said Cadet Sander McDonald of Churchill Avenue. “And the activities were really fun.”

During the night, cadets sat huddled around a warm fire as the officers entertained them with ghost stories. They were given the opportunity to sleep in the forest – inside the shelters they created.

Air cadets tell stories by the fire. Photo by Kingsong Chen

On Sunday, the final activity was a summer biathlon challenge, which was composed of marksmanship and running. After a safety briefing and a demonstration, cadets were ready to have their turn with the air rifles. “Running a range at the FTX proved to be a unique experience,” said Sergeant Bradley Martire of Barrie Avenue. “Many of the junior cadets had an excellent time trying their hand at precision shooting and a summer biathlon competition.”

For the older cadets, this was an opportunity to demonstrate their leadership skills. The weekend’s events were planned and organized by the senior cadets with some assistance from the officers. “We worked together very well,” said Warrant Officer Second Class Samantha Cianfaglione of Patricia Avenue. “And I think it’s brought us closer as a group.”

Air Cadets is a free youth program, open to youth, 12-19. 211 Air Cadets meet on Wednesdays at Notre Dame High School from 6:30 pm to 9:15 pm. For more info: 211aircadets.com

 

 

Bill Maynard: 'Owl eyes' wildlife photographer

 

Saw-whet owl wins Westboro wildlife photographer first prize

UPDATE: This article originally appeared in Kitchissippi Times July 26, 2012. Bill Maynard’s famous owl photograph now adorns a bus as part of an advertising campaign for the Museum of Nature.

Westboro wildlife photographer Bill Maynard will wake up at any hour and patiently wait as long as it takes—sometimes upward of five hours—to find a stunning shot. He’s the winner of the bird photo of the year for his close-up of a saw-whet owl in Canadian Geographic’s wildlife photography contest. The winning photo will be published in an upcoming issue of Canadian Geographic and was on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature until August 26.

“The saw-whet owl is the smallest owl in North America at just 6-8 inches,” says Maynard who found this one on Amherst Island, near Kingston. “They weigh three ounces and hang out in coniferous trees. If you saw this little owl sitting on a branch, you’d think it was a Christmas ornament, especially because its defence mechanism is to sit very, very still.”

Maynard knew this photo was special when he took it as nocturnal saw-whets only open their eyes for about five seconds when you come close to them before going back to sleep. Other photos he’s seen of saw-whets have their eyes closed.

A passionate wildlife photographer who hopes his prints inspire people to become more involved in wildlife conservation, Maynard posts his best shots on his website, coolwildlife.com. Living close to the Ottawa River, Maynard says many of his waterfowl pictures—with the exception of the loon shots—are taken in Kitchissippi.

To celebrate his upcoming 50th birthday, Maynard is treating himself to an exclusive photography trip to Alaska’s Katmai Coast to take pictures of grizzly bears with a guide and a group of six other photographers. “Art Wolfe is a wildlife photographer I admire,” explains Maynard. “I watched a documentary of him on the exact same trip, taking pictures of the grizzly bears while they’re catching salmon and uninterested in humans. I booked the trip over a year and a half ago. My friends think I’m nuts, but for a wildlife photographer, sitting in a bug jacket on a sardine boat and taking pictures of grizzlies in 21 hours of daylight is a dream vacation.”

ArtsPark: The urban village fair turns ten

The invitational art show is always at the heart of ArtsPark. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

To celebrate 10 years of Hintonburg’s now famous ArtsPark, we caught up with Charles Reynolds, one of the founding members of the Hintonburg Community Association’s arts committee who envisioned and created the free, low-key festival celebrating art, craft, music, poetry, dance, theatre and neighbours. Now living in his great-grandfather’s renovated 1898 country home in Hartland, New Brunswick, Reynolds described the festival’s beginnings.

“Initially it was kind of spur of the moment,” said Reynolds. “We had established the notion of an Arts district in Hintonburg and we knew there were lots of artists in the neighbourhood, so we made some arrangements with Parkdale Market. I also remember chaos and being in the park at 5:30 am to close the streets. But it all magically came about. Everyone who participated was well pleased.”

Kids’ art table at ArtsPark. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

From the beginning, ArtsPark’s goal was always to feature the artists and crafts people who exhibited at the festival. “I was going through my scrap book and noticing that a lot of the artists who have participated are so enthusiastic about the exposure,” said Reynolds, noting that this was especially true for emerging artists. “A jewellery designer said that from the first year she participated to the second her sales had quadrupled,” he said.

Kids add their art to the gallery. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

Reynolds is delighted that the Parkdale Park now has a permanent stage and is “a very beautiful urban park.”

ArtsPark is a time to meet and visit with friends, family and neighbours. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

Speaking of the changes that have come to Hintonburg from 2003 to 2013, Reynolds said, “As the neighbourhood is changing and the becoming more desireable from a business point of view, ArtsPark still has a home-grown feel to it. ArtsPark reminds people that Hintonburg is a village, with a vibrant feel.”

Local food is a big part of ArtsPark. Photo by Kathleen Wilker

Held on Mother’s Day for many years, ArtsPark is now on the last Sunday of May for a better chance of warmer weather. This year ArtsPark is May 25, from 10am-5pm.

  ArtsPark Photo Contest:

Share your Instagram photos and win!

Igers: share your Instagram photos using #ArtsPark2013, then visit kitchissippi.com or Kitchissippi Times on facebook to view the community photogallery. One lucky entry will win a gift from an ArtsPark artisan!

Leilani Farha: First recipient of the Spirit of Barbra Schlifer Award

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-CA
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}


<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true"
DefSemiHidden=”true” DefQFormat=”false” DefPriority=”99″
LatentStyleCount=”267″>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Normal”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”heading 1″/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Title”/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtitle”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Strong”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Table Grid”/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”No Spacing”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 1″/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”List Paragraph”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Quote”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Quote”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Se
mi
Hidden=”false”
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shad
ing 2 Ac
cent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtle Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtle Reference”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Reference”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Book Title”/>

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

Champlain Park resident Leilani Farha, executive director of Canada Without Poverty, is receiving the first annual Spirit of Barbra Schlifer Award for her advocacy work. She wants to see female victims of violence have access to housing in Canada and around the world. Photo by Kristy Strauss

Champlain Park resident awarded for advocacy

Leilani Farha is tired of women being ignored when it comes to access to housing. She believes that Canada – and the world – needs to do better.

Now the Champlain Park resident is being honoured for her efforts in the first annual Spirit of Barbra Schlifer Award.

The award is in memory of a young Toronto lawyer who was raped and murdered in 1980, and given out by the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic – which gives legal help and counseling to women who are victims of violence.

Leilani Farhar at her Canada Without Poverty office.

“There are a lot of incredible advocates out there doing incredible work. I’m just one of many,” said Farha, from her Canada Without Poverty office.

The executive director of the organization has worked for two decades advocating that women, who are victims of violence, have the right to adequate housing.

Housing issues were always on her mind when she was young, Farha said, especially in her university years. She had the opportunity to work with homeless youth, and quickly realized how important housing is.

“Housing is such a cornerstone to health, employment  . . . a sense of security,” she said, adding that she also noticed women were being kept out of the dialogue. “Regardless of the society you live in, the bottom line is women tend to spent more time in the home. And it struck me as odd – human rights is about putting disadvantaged people at the centre of the core, and that wasn’t happening.”

Farha said her neighbourhood is on her mind often while she’s at work, especially when it comes to affordability of homes.

“I think higher density living is cool, but who can afford it?” she said. “It does have an impact on me, and I think of these things all the time.”

She added that while property prices are going up, she enjoys the Champlain Park community – especially with her two children.

“As the kids are getting older, they’re getting their independence through the park,” Farha said. “I use the Ottawa River Parkway to go running, and I really enjoy it. I feel we’re part of the community – but I have yet to go to the mosque.”

In addition to enjoying all that Champlain Park has to offer a family, Farha said she encourages those in her community – and in every community – to engage in social issues.

Having a respectful debate makes for a more vibrant democracy, she said, and will help make this country a better place.

“I’ve been told by people who visit Canada, that they find we as a population don’t have a rigorous debate about the social, political and legal issues of the day,” Farha said. “It’s part of our politeness, and I think we need to get over that.”

She added that Canada has the money and resources to do better, and get people off the street – especially women who are victims of violence.

“We have 250,000 people living in shelters and the streets in this country, but we’re not doing as well as we could be doing,” Farha said.

KT Going Out: May 9-22, 2013

800×600

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-CA
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;}

Kitchissippi Times
Going Out Listings
May 9-22

Live Music

May 9
Brian Browne, Juniper Kitchen & Wine Bar, 245 Richmond Rd

May 10
AlphaSoul Jazz Night @ 9:00pm,
AlphaSoul Café, 1015 Wellington St. W
Pop Gun @ 10:00pm,
Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St
Jazz artists Renee Yoxon & Mark Ferguson @ 7:30pm, GigSpace, 953 Gladstone Ave

May 11
Shameless Blues @ 10:00pm,
Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St
Evan Tighe – Ottawa Album Launch for “Threadcount” @ 8:00pm, GigSpace, 953 Gladstone Ave

May 16
Jazz Night @ 8:00pm,
Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St
Brian Browne, Juniper Kitchen & Wine Bar, 245 Richmond Rd

May 17
AlphaSoul Jazz Night @ 9:00pm,
AlphaSoul Café, 1015 Wellington St. W
The Ryvyls @ 10:00pm,
Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St
Sweet Lovers Love the Spring – Diane Nalini, David Renaud, Adrian Cho @ 7:30pm, GigSpace, 953 Gladstone Ave

May 18
Rockafella @ 10:00pm,
Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St

May 19
DJ Sweetcheeks @ 9:00pm,
The Hintonburg Public House, 1020 Wellington St W

Comedy/Open Mic

May 9
Open Stage @ 8:00pm, Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong St

May 12
General Trivia @ 7:00pm, Royal Oak Pub, 1217 Wellington St


Open Mic: Jon Reilly-Roe @ 9:00pm, The Hintonburg Public House, 1020 Wellington St W

May 13
Sports Trivia @ 7:00pm, Royal Oak Pub, 1217 Wellington St

May 15
Karaoke Wednesdays @ 9:00pm, Whispers Pub & Eatery, 249 Richmond Rd

May 16
Psychic Night with Matt Stapley @ 7:00pm,
AlphaSoul Café, 1015 Wellington St. W

May 19
General Trivia @ 7:00pm, Royal Oak Pub, 1217 Wellington St

May 20
Sports Trivia @ 7:00pm, Royal Oak Pub, 1217 Wellington St

May 22
Karaoke Wednesdays @ 9:00pm, Whispers Pub & Eatery, 249 Richmond Rd

Gallery Listings

Inside Out, until May. 19, Orange Art Gallery 233 Armstrong St

Flora, until May. 26, Cube Gallery, 1285 Wellington St. W

Tulips in the Capital, until Jun. 2, Orange Art Gallery 233 Armstrong St

The III Show, until Jun.11, Exposure Gallery, 1255 Wellington St. W

 

Theatre Listings

Performance Company presents the Government Inspector, May. 10-11, Ottawa School of Speech & Drama, 294 Picton Ave

In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play, May. 15- Jun. 1, The Gladstone, 910 Gladstone Ave

Western LRT open house: Carling route is off the table

Richmond Underground is the City’s preferred route

By Kathleen Wilker

Hundreds of citizens attended last night’s City of Ottawa open house on the Western LRT line and crowded into council chambers to hear about the presentation.

The City’s Deputy City Manager (Planning and Infrastructure), Nancy Schepers, began the presentation. The presentation consisted largely of three sections: an outline of why the Carling Avenue route was not appropriate; an outline of key community concerns that were being taken into consideration in route choice and a look at the City’s preferred route choice, called Richmond Underground.

Carling was dismissed as a route choice because it was slower than the other routes, it would require continued bus service, it was more expensive than other options and it would require transfers to the airport, among other considerations.

Key community concerns that guided Council’s decision about the 15 initial proposed routes included: protecting and not ruining the Byron Linear Park, connecting and not dividing the community, encouraging (not restricting) access to greenspace, waterfront and pathway network and avoiding (not making use of) the Parkway.

The Richmond Underground route, estimated to cost $900 million, protects the Byron Linear Park and keeps the LRT off the Parkway. This is the shortest and fastest route identified. City slides also say it maintains community connectivity and encourages access to greenspace. These claims (about community connectivity and access to greenspace) were hotly contested by residents in the over three hour question and answer session that followed the presentation.

A number of common concerns emerged from resident questions. People felt the consultation process was rushed and inadequate. When residents pointed out that the comment form handed out prior to the meeting asked for feedback only on the Richmond Underground route, including specifics like suggested locations for the three pedestrian access corridors, Councillor Egli, Chair of the Transportation Committee, said that Council did, in fact, want feedback on all four routes still on the table.

People also expressed frustration that although construction for the Western LRT is ten years away, the deadline for submitting comments to westerlrt@ottawa.ca is May 10. Councillor Egli encouraged residents to attend the June 5 Transportation Committee meeting. “Delegations are encouraged,” Egli said, explaining that the deadlines are for Council to finalize the Transportation Master Plan.

After numerous pro-Carling comments and questions, Councillor Hobbs was asked if she would support the Carling route at Council. Councillor Hobbs answered that she would support it as a secondary, future route in the overall transit network but would not support it as the Western LRT route.

Many questions also addressed cost. Residents spoke to other cities, like Boston, that are currently reclaiming their waterfronts and relocating transit underground at considerable cost. Residents whose homes are located within metres of the proposed Richmond Underground route expressed concern over years of construction and asked if their potentially decreased property values were taken into consideration during the costing of the project. They were told that studies indicate that property values of homes located close to transit increase.

Neighbours for Smart Western Rail suggested that focusing on a Western LRT route that takes people from the suburbs to Tunney’s Pasture instead of looking at all the other origins and destinations along the route does not fully examine all the places of employment, shopping and recreation where people in Ottawa want to go throughout the day.

Residents asked if tax hikes could pay for a route like Carling (which, if located underground is estimated to cost $2.3 billion). A 1% property tax increase would raise $ 12 million, residents were told.

To submit your comments on the proposed routes, email: westernLRT@ottawa.ca by May 10.

 

The Farm Show: a poignant glimpse into a disappearing rural existence

by Judith van Berkom

The Ottawa Theatre School’s graduate students presented an enthusiastic, lively rendition of the true Canadian classic 1972 play, The Farm Show. The young actors’ passion for their performances was infectious. This is their final play in the last year of a three-year fully accredited Performing Arts Conservatory Program. The play opened on April 22, runs until April 27, and is directed by Andy Massingham.

A collective creation 40 years ago by Toronto-based Theatre Passe Muraille, The Farm Show transports us to the small town of Clinton in rural Southwestern Ontario.

The original performance took place in a barn and was the result of a group of actors’ experiences working with farmers – helping them out – and then writing about those experiences. The current play takes us back almost 50 years and in a light, often comedic and yet poignant storytelling fashion gives us a glimpse into rural life – the hopes and dreams, fears and losses associated with a disappearing way of life.

The 9-person cast play multiple roles, on a sparse stage where they transform into farmers or farm animals and anything or everything in between, delighting and captivating their audience.

As Canadian farmers struggle to make a living for themselves and their children, the audience is confronted with their bleek economic future — young people moving away, the high cost of equipment and land, accidents associated with mechanisation and government regulations. But the play also introduces us to hard working and, at times, eccentric farm personalities. The question that remains is ‘Where will our food come from in the future?’

The Farm Show — April 22 to 27, 8 p.m. 294 Picton Ave.  Tickets for final performances are available here

MORE: Ottawa Theatre School volunteer, Natalie Hanson, enters stage left.